The Power of Legacy Thinking

I am fortunate to be from a family of immigrants and pioneers who braved the snows and hardships of northern Idaho in the mid-1800s.


While I never met my great-great or my great-grandparents, what they accomplished is something I always think of with pride.


They came with nothing and ended up starting several homesteads that their decendents still live on and farm, ranch, or operate businesses out of today.


In addition to that, in my small hometown of a few thousand people, they helped to fund and donated land for schools and building projects that still exist today, well over 100 years later.


Every time I go to the old family ground and pass by this beautiful stone church I think of my great-great grandfather and the vision he and the rest of the community had in building things that lasted.


They didn’t think in months or quarters. They thought in generations.


I am proud to be carrying on this tradition by furthering a new agricultural solution for the 21st century.


One of my favorite quotes is in the movie Gladiator where Maximus says “What we do in life echoes in eternity”


No one knows what happens really after this life is over. But I feel close to my ancestors because of how their projects and forethought endured to give even 4-5 generations later a far better life.


We need this approach when building business. While nothing lasts forever…what are we doing now that will reflect down through the next generation?


How are we stewarding our resources?


How are we creating generational wealth?


How do we create more drivers and opportunities for generational wealth for more people?


I think we live in a thoroughly exciting time where we are the generation tasked with creating lasting solutions in especially high-nutritious food, self-sufficient and clean energy, and rebuilding the social fabric of a very tired people.


I am confident that we can rise to the occasion where our grandchildren will be proud of us. So let’s do it.


(St. Gertrude’s Monastery, built in 1912 still operates to this day. The land for this was donated by my great-great grandfather)